Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Youth, Slut-Shaming and Cuddle Parties in Melissa Fosos’s ‘Girlhood’


The longest and dirtiest – Fosso can be called Slutiest – Peace, in this collection “Thanks to Peace You Care,” is set in this collection partly between two cuddle parties where neither nudity nor anyone ” The bikini area “is allowed to touch. (Fosos informed us that these ceremonies were invented in 2004, and that the Cuddle Party was incorporated in 2016.) The title of the essay comes from what people who reject it should say Someone denies their touch. The Cuddle Party scenes are read like a short story with memorable characters, especially Phios’s supportive and loving girlfriend, Donica – “the kind of person who moves quickly towards the end of a porn video after her orgasm So to make sure everyone comes. ” At the first party, Phosos role-no. Saying, then passively allows those who want to touch him, an experience that he finds quietness and elation. The narrative then moves on to the manifesto arena: Fios recounts interviews conducted with former strippers, all of whom “agreed on the work that they wanted to touch or did not enjoy.” His recollection leads Fios to believe that his own experiences are unfortunately normal. At Donica’s suggestion, Fidos goes to another cuddle party as a “mistress” No“- practicing denying anything she wishes she didn’t feel like doing – with great success. At the end of this piece, Fios credits her empowerment to” hearing the truth of other women ” gave.

The final essay, “Les Calanix”, puts a spin on the general “double perspective” in the memoir. Melissa is somber today, and a published writer in an art colony in the south of France, where she had not been for 20 years, almost half her life. Melissa previously fled from New York to France to escape a lover who was addicted to heroin just like her. She found a new partner in a gay Algerian immigrant who was about to suffer the same abuse and embarrassing Melissa. They formed a delightful, dope-shared friendship that surpassed the demands of gender, sexuality, patriarchy. Now, in Kasis, Fosos spends his morning, who undergoes physical therapy for an injury he sustained after walking for several years. However, the two Melissa are not with each other, but dear friends, whose “bodies curl in the same parentheses.” Karuna Fosos searches for her younger self which is inspiring.

I could do without some of the other voices in this book – Lacans, Wharton’s, even some of his interview subjects – if only because Fios’s own voice is so irrational and original. However, the purpose of this book is not only to tell about his own life, but also to listen to the pulses of many others. In his author’s note, Fosos writes that he has “found company in the stories of other women, and the revelations of all our syncretism itself are curious.” This solidarity puts “girlhood” in a feminist canon that includes the theory-of-mind creations of Fios’s idol, Adrienne Rich, and Maggie Nelson: smart, radical company, and not at all ordinary.



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